The fascination of organ building

 

 

Kuhn Organ Builders Ltd, 2008

New organ

Windchests
slider chests
Key action
mechanical
Stop action
electrical
Inauguration
29.06.2008
Case design
Uwe Schacht
Voicing
Rudolf Aebischer


www.orgelbau.ch/ope=114210

Gerlingen

II/P/24

Germany, Baden-Wurttemberg
Kath. Kirche St. Peter und Paul

© pictures Orgelbau Kuhn AG, Männedorf

Kuhn Organ Builders Ltd, 2008

New organ

Windchests
slider chests
Key action
mechanical
Stop action
electrical
Inauguration
29.06.2008
Case design
Uwe Schacht
Voicing
Rudolf Aebischer

All of a piece

The organ as a church instrument with a centuries old tradition really does not need to be reinvented. This is a generally accepted fact. It is also generally accepted that the traditional art of organ building will continuously be refined and perfected - a process that will never end. Furthermore, it is accepted that the ultimate sound is always shaped by the organ builder and the voicer. In a comparable sense there is hardly any discussion about our principle of providing all our new organs with mechanical action, flexible wind supply as well as electric or mechanical stop actions.

Opinions concerning the design of the organ case, however, are divided: imitations of the old style are barely criticised, whereas modern design is seldom appreciated spontaneously. Reference to the period of origin is nevertheless legitimate in our view. It is even grounded in the tradition itself. In fact, the styles of the periods have at all times shown up in the front pipe arrangement. The famous organ in the abbey church of Neresheim (1792-1779) and the organ in the Catholic church of St. Georg in Ulm (1904) for example are both concise manifestations of their period.

Wherever the personal taste or the individual sense of style lie, in our view the design of the organ case must refer to its surroundings. For the room will be the organ's permanent home, and the organ the room's inhabitant. Therefore our goal in Gerlingen was a dialogue between the colour and design vocabulary of the organ and the room in order to create a holistic aesthetic and a harmonic atmosphere.

In realising this philosophy, we took up the prevailing stylistic element of the slightly curved arc from the arch of the side aisle and of the nave roof. At exactly the same angle, but in reverse, the shape of the organ points heavenwards in a big, joyful gesture. As far as colour is concerned, we kept the instrument in the same light hue that characterises the whole room. Therefore, organ and architecture appear to be all of a piece.

Translation: RS 2008



www.orgelbau.ch/ope=114210