The fascination of organ building

 

 

Kuhn Organ Builders Ltd, 2010

New organ

Windchests
slider chests
Key action
mechanical
Stop action
mechanical
Inauguration
28.05.2010
Expert
Jürg Sigrist
Case design
Christoph Jedele
Voicing
Thierry Pécaut


www.orgelbau.ch/ope=114290

Rüti

II/P/12

Switzerland, Zurich
Krematorium

© pictures Orgelbau Kuhn AG, Männedorf

Kuhn Organ Builders Ltd, 2010

New organ

Windchests
slider chests
Key action
mechanical
Stop action
mechanical
Inauguration
28.05.2010
Expert
Jürg Sigrist
Case design
Christoph Jedele
Voicing
Thierry Pécaut

Completing the circle

The first organ in the crematorium in Rüti dates back to 1929, the year in which the building itself was erected. The sound of the original organ was typical of the late Romantic era and the instrument was designed to merge into the architecture of the room. In 1951, this organ was dismantled and sold. Two other instruments followed, the more recent of which was always regarded as being just a provisional solution, although it was in service for 40 years. The memorial hall was renovated in 2009, which provided the opportunity for building a new organ that would do justice to the dignity of the location in every respect.

The unadorned functionalism which characterised the original instrument is reflected in the new organ which manifests an unpretentious elegance. Although the variously graduated arrays of frontpipes have been designed to be as discreet as possible, they nevertheless express a subtle vigour and a playful delight in the interplay of elements which is also emphasised by the carefully chosen colour scheme. Like its predecessor, the new organ has an unobtrusive appearance which is subtly incorporated into the architecture of the room. - This peaceful harmony completes the full circle, honouring the past and symbolically guiding the way into the future.

The repertoire encompassed by this instrument is naturally restricted by its 12 stops. But these are so well distributed within the divisions and adjusted to the specific needs of the site that they offer an organist a variety of opportunities generally only provided by a far larger instrument. Four 8 foot fluestops form the backbone of the organ's sound, together with its 16 foot subbass. The 8 foot oboe and the higher register manual stops allow for multiple variations of solo registration and mixed sounds. Naturally, the stops of the second manual are housed in an effective swell box - which is not all that unusual for a Kuhn organ - making it possible to accompany even the most delicate solo voice with due deference.

Translation: C.T.