The fascination of organ building

 

 

Kuhn Organ Builders Ltd, 2002

Restoration

Organ built by
Friedrich Goll, 1889
Windchests
cone chests
Key action
mechanical
Stop action
mechanical
Inauguration
08.09.2002
Expert
Rudolf Bruhin
Voicing
Raymond Petzold


www.orgelbau.ch/ope=801190

St-Saphorin

II/P/10

Switzerland, Vaud
Eglise réf.

© pictures Orgelbau Kuhn AG, Männedorf

Kuhn Organ Builders Ltd, 2002

Restoration

Organ built by
Friedrich Goll, 1889
Windchests
cone chests
Key action
mechanical
Stop action
mechanical
Inauguration
08.09.2002
Expert
Rudolf Bruhin
Voicing
Raymond Petzold

In perfect harmony

The organ of St. Saphorin, a wine growing region on Lake Geneva, was built in 1889 by Friedrich Goll of Lucerne as opus 73. This German-Romantic instrument is typical of the period but, over the years, underwent a number of small modifications. The aim of the restoration work of 2001-2002 was to return the organ to its original condition.

In retrospect the restoration of the organ of St. Saphorin appears to have been blessed by good fortune: first of all we were presented with a photograph of the old instrument which had been discovered. From this picture we could tell exactly what this organ, with Swell, had been like. All ranks of the organ had originally stood in the swell box, not only those of Manual II as had first been presumed. This discovery also explained why a number of pipes were set up next to the windchest. They had to make room for the casing wall of the swell box which had been built in during the first half of the 20th century and later removed again. In this way the photograph had put us on the right track - a real stroke of luck.

But that wasn't all. A number of original components of the pedal mechanism which could be incorporated into the restoration had also been recovered. For the stop list we were even able to include original pipes from another Goll organ. Technically the organ consisted of more original material after the restoration than previously. All parts of the organ were, in addition, carefully dismantled, overhauled and built back in to the instrument. The voicing work was carried out by Raymond Petzold.

Legend has it that organ builders used to be paid in the volume of wine which would fill the largest pipe of an organ. Here the instrument and the grape have once again found new ties: with the rediscovery of the organ's voice, the melodic-sounding name of St. Saphorin resounds in a perfect harmonic partnership.